FEEL BETTER FASTER

From minimally invasive procedures leaving practically no scarring to skillful traditional, open surgeries, our team has more experience performing a full range of vascular services than any other hospital in the region—even more than the next two area hospitals combined. We make sure your life-saving procedure is done right—the first time. But, in addition to unmatched experience, it’s our exemplary-care model and emphasis on holistic well-being that make St. Joseph’s Health a pillar of the Central New York community. At the intersection of precision, expertise, and compassion, our vascular team will make your procedure, scarring, and recovery feel miraculously minimal.

A Clear Leader in Complex Vascular Surgery

Vascular health affects every system in the body, meaning that for every vascular procedure—from carotid stenting and ongoing hemodialysis grafting to major arterial bypass surgery and major arterial reconstruction—your specialist, treatment, and recovery process matter. That’s why choosing the team with the most experience with the full range of minimal to complex vascular procedures sets you up for a shorter hospital stay, less scarring, and a faster recovery. Feel better faster, and get back to doing what matters most to you.

miraculously minimal

A HIGHER LEVEL OF CARE

 

At St. Joseph’s Health, “A Higher Level of Care” is the guiding philosophy that drives our continuous improvement in all areas of performance: from technology to safety, and from efficiency to clinical outcomes. Here are just a few measures of our success.

High Performing in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Repair

Due to our exceptional patient outcomes, St. Joseph’s Health Hospital was rated High Performing in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Repair in 2017.

Best Regional Hospital

We are incredibly proud to have our team’s unmatched dedication recognized in U.S. News & World Report.

Magnet Recognition

Our team of nurses received Magnet Recognition for their exemplary care, quality, professionalism, and compassion—all of which are reflected in patient outcomes.

  • Minimal surgeries

  • Carotid Stenting

    In this procedure, the surgeon places a small stainless-steel device (stent) in the carotid artery, providing a framework for the artery to keep it from collapsing. This minimally invasive procedure improves blood flow and reduces the risk of a stroke.

  • Percutaneous Balloon Angioplasty

    An angioplasty widens narrowed or obstructed arteries by inserting a collapsed balloon on a guide wire, known as a balloon catheter. The balloon is inflated to crush the fatty deposits, opening up the blood vessel for improved blood flow. The balloon is then deflated and withdrawn.

  • Stenting

    Stenting is minimally invasive and involves the surgeon placing a small stainless-steel device in a blood vessel, providing a framework for the artery to keep it from collapsing.

  • Thrombolytic Therapy

    In this procedure, the surgeon injects medication directly into the bloodstream to dissolve clots.

  • Varicose Vein Surgery

    Standard treatment for varicose veins involves making a small incision over the vein and pulling it out with a hook. The main vein that feeds the varicose veins can be shut down with heat using a catheter that is inserted into the vein at the knee. This procedure has replaced the old vein stripping that used to be done 15–20 years ago.

  • Arteriovenous Fistula for Hemodialysis

    A special type of access used for patients requiring hemodialysis, called an arteriovenous (AV) fistula, is placed surgically in the arm; it involves joining an artery and a vein together so patients can recieve treatment.

  • COMPLEX surgeries

  • Carotid Endarterectomy

    This procedure clears the major blood vessel(s) in the neck of fatty buildup. The major purpose of this procedure is to prevent a blockage of blood that could lead to a stroke. St. Joseph's surgeons perform more than 300 carotid endarterectomies annually – more than twice the number of any other hospital in Central New York.

  • Open Repair: Abdominal, Aortic + Thoracic Aneurysms

    Open repairs of aortic aneurysms traditionally require large incisions in the chest or abdomen. A cylindrical tube called a graft is sewn into the aorta, replacing the aorta where the aneurysm is. Repairing an aneurysm can often now be done through two incisions, one in each groin. The ability to do this surgery depends on the location of the aneurysm.

  • Major Arterial Bypass

    Major blockages may be bypassed (detouring the blood flow around the blockage) using a patient's existing vein or a synthetic graft (tube). This improves blood flow down to the foot.

To find out more about these procedures, learn key terms related to vascular health, and find a specialist, visit our site.

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Experience a Higher Level of Care

REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT

Specialized, Experienced Teams

Our vascular team works collaboratively with our colleagues in cardiology, internal medicine, interventional radiology, and podiatry to guarantee each patient a multidisciplinary diagnostic assessment and therapeutic plan. Our surgeons are experts in minimally invasive or endovascular surgical methods, though they are also the most experienced in the region in complex, open procedures.

 

LEARN MORE

State-of-the-Art
Surgical Suites

Our 15 operating rooms have full digital integration, with boom-mounted technology and space to accommodate our emerging surgical techniques. Each room is spacious and fully equipped as a state-of-the-art Central Sterile Unit, reducing the risk of hospital-acquired infections and creating more time to focus on patient care.

 

LEARN MORE

Track Your Loved One’s Progress in Comfort

Track your loved one’s progress through surgery and recovery with our automated status boards. After the procedure is over, you’ll get a personal review from the surgeon.

 

LEARN MORE

 

Rooms Designed
for Healing

All of our patients recover in private, naturally lit rooms, big and quiet enough to suit family visits. Our state-of-the-art “smart” Beds do everything―from alerting nurses to patients at risk of a fall to adjusting the lights and televisions. Our “WOWs,” or Workstations on Wheels, allow caregivers to freely focus on patient needs in their rooms, rather than moving the patients to the equipment.

 

LEARN MORE

our vascular surgeons are here for you

Because your vascular health matters to us, you can get back to doing what matters to you.

REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT

miraculously minimal

A Clear Leader in Complex Vascular Surgery

Vascular health affects every system in the body, meaning that for every vascular procedure—from carotid stenting and ongoing hemodialysis grafting to major arterial bypass surgery and major arterial reconstruction—your specialist, treatment, and recovery process matter. That’s why choosing the team with the most experience with the full range of minimal to complex vascular procedures sets you up for a shorter hospital stay, less scarring, and a faster recovery. Feel better faster, and get back to doing what matters most to you.

  • Minimal surgeries

  • Carotid Stenting

    In this procedure, the surgeon places a small stainless-steel device (stent) in the carotid artery, providing a framework for the artery to keep it from collapsing. This minimally invasive procedure improves blood flow and reduces the risk of a stroke.

  • Percutaneous Balloon Angioplasty

    An angioplasty widens narrowed or obstructed arteries by inserting a collapsed balloon on a guide wire, known as a balloon catheter. The balloon is inflated to crush the fatty deposits, opening up the blood vessel for improved blood flow. The balloon is then deflated and withdrawn.

  • Stenting

    Stenting is minimally invasive and involves the surgeon placing a small stainless-steel device in a blood vessel, providing a framework for the artery to keep it from collapsing.

  • Thrombolytic Therapy

    In this procedure, the surgeon injects medication directly into the bloodstream to dissolve clots.

  • Varicose Vein Surgery

    Standard treatment for varicose veins involves making a small incision over the vein and pulling it out with a hook. The main vein that feeds the varicose veins can be shut down with heat using a catheter that is inserted into the vein at the knee. This procedure has replaced the old vein stripping that used to be done 15–20 years ago.

  • Arteriovenous Fistula for Hemodialysis

    A special type of access used for patients requiring hemodialysis, called an arteriovenous (AV) fistula, is placed surgically in the arm; it involves joining an artery and a vein together so patients can recieve treatment.

  • COMPLEX surgeries

  • Carotid Endarterectomy

    This procedure clears the major blood vessel(s) in the neck of fatty buildup. The major purpose of this procedure is to prevent a blockage of blood that could lead to a stroke. St. Joseph's surgeons perform more than 300 carotid endarterectomies annually – more than twice the number of any other hospital in Central New York.

  • Open Repair: Abdominal,
    Aortic + Thoracic Aneurysms

    Open repairs of aortic aneurysms traditionally require large incisions in the chest or abdomen. A cylindrical tube called a graft is sewn into the aorta, replacing the aorta where the aneurysm is. Repairing an aneurysm can often now be done through two incisions, one in each groin. The ability to do this surgery depends on the location of the aneurysm.

  • Major Arterial Bypass

    Major blockages may be bypassed (detouring the blood flow around the blockage) using a patient's existing vein or a synthetic graft (tube). This improves blood flow down to the foot.

Specialized,
Experienced Teams

Our vascular team works collaboratively with our colleagues in cardiology, internal medicine, interventional radiology, and podiatry to guarantee each patient a multidisciplinary diagnostic assessment and therapeutic plan. Our surgeons are experts in minimally invasive or endovascular surgical methods, though they are also the most experienced in the region in complex, open procedures.

 

LEARN MORE

Rooms Designed
for Healing

All of our patients recover in private, naturally lit rooms, big and quiet enough to suit family visits. Our state-of-the-art “smart” Beds do everything―from alerting nurses to patients at risk of a fall to adjusting the lights and televisions. Our “WOWs,” or Workstations on Wheels, allow caregivers to freely focus on patient needs in their rooms, rather than moving the patients to the equipment.

 

LEARN MORE

State-of-the-Art
Surgical Suites

Our 15 operating rooms have full digital integration, with boom-mounted technology and space to accommodate our emerging surgical techniques. Each room is spacious and fully equipped as a state-of-the-art Central Sterile Unit, reducing the risk of hospital-acquired infections and creating more time to focus on patient care.

 

LEARN MORE

Track Your Loved One’s Progress in Comfort

Track your loved one’s progress through surgery and recovery with our automated status boards. After the procedure is over, you’ll get a personal review from the surgeon.

 

LEARN MORE

 

  • Minimal surgeries

  • Carotid Stenting

    In this procedure, the surgeon places a small stainless-steel device (stent) in the carotid artery, providing a framework for the artery to keep it from collapsing. This minimally invasive procedure improves blood flow and reduces the risk of a stroke.

  • Percutaneous Balloon Angioplasty

    An angioplasty widens narrowed or obstructed arteries by inserting a collapsed balloon on a guide wire, known as a balloon catheter. The balloon is inflated to crush the fatty deposits, opening up the blood vessel for improved blood flow. The balloon is then deflated and withdrawn.

  • Stenting

    Stenting is minimally invasive and involves the surgeon placing a small stainless-steel device in a blood vessel, providing a framework for the artery to keep it from collapsing.

  • Thrombolytic Therapy

    In this procedure, the surgeon injects medication directly into the bloodstream to dissolve clots.

  • Varicose Vein Surgery

    Standard treatment for varicose veins involves making a small incision over the vein and pulling it out with a hook. The main vein that feeds the varicose veins can be shut down with heat using a catheter that is inserted into the vein at the knee. This procedure has replaced the old vein stripping that used to be done 15–20 years ago.

  • Arteriovenous Fistula for Hemodialysis

    A special type of access used for patients requiring hemodialysis, called an arteriovenous (AV) fistula, is placed surgically in the arm; it involves joining an artery and a vein together so patients can recieve treatment.

  • COMPLEX surgeries

  • Carotid Endarterectomy

    This procedure clears the major blood vessel(s) in the neck of fatty buildup. The major purpose of this procedure is to prevent a blockage of blood that could lead to a stroke. St. Joseph's surgeons perform more than 300 carotid endarterectomies annually – more than twice the number of any other hospital in Central New York.

  • Open Repair: Abdominal,
    Aortic + Thoracic Aneurysms

    Open repairs of aortic aneurysms traditionally require large incisions in the chest or abdomen. A cylindrical tube called a graft is sewn into the aorta, replacing the aorta where the aneurysm is. Repairing an aneurysm can often now be done through two incisions, one in each groin. The ability to do this surgery depends on the location of the aneurysm.

  • Major Arterial Bypass

    Major blockages may be bypassed (detouring the blood flow around the blockage) using a patient's existing vein or a synthetic graft (tube). This improves blood flow down to the foot.

miraculously minimal
miraculously minimal

A Clear Leader in Complex Vascular Surgery

Vascular health affects every system in the body, meaning that for every vascular procedure—from carotid stenting and ongoing hemodialysis grafting to major arterial bypass surgery and major arterial reconstruction—your specialist, treatment, and recovery process matter. That’s why choosing the team with the most experience with the full range of minimal to complex vascular procedures sets you up for a shorter hospital stay, less scarring, and a faster recovery. Feel better faster, and get back to doing what matters most to you.

  • Minimal surgeries

  • Carotid Stenting

    In this procedure, the surgeon places a small stainless-steel device (stent) in the carotid artery, providing a framework for the artery to keep it from collapsing. This minimally invasive procedure improves blood flow and reduces the risk of a stroke.

  • Percutaneous Balloon Angioplasty

    An angioplasty widens narrowed or obstructed arteries by inserting a collapsed balloon on a guide wire, known as a balloon catheter. The balloon is inflated to crush the fatty deposits, opening up the blood vessel for improved blood flow. The balloon is then deflated and withdrawn.

  • Stenting

    Stenting is minimally invasive and involves the surgeon placing a small stainless-steel device in a blood vessel, providing a framework for the artery to keep it from collapsing.

  • Thrombolytic Therapy

    In this procedure, the surgeon injects medication directly into the bloodstream to dissolve clots.

  • Varicose Vein Surgery

    Standard treatment for varicose veins involves making a small incision over the vein and pulling it out with a hook. The main vein that feeds the varicose veins can be shut down with heat using a catheter that is inserted into the vein at the knee. This procedure has replaced the old vein stripping that used to be done 15–20 years ago.

  • Arteriovenous Fistula for Hemodialysis

    A special type of access used for patients requiring hemodialysis, called an arteriovenous (AV) fistula, is placed surgically in the arm; it involves joining an artery and a vein together so patients can recieve treatment.

  • COMPLEX surgeries

  • Carotid Endarterectomy

    This procedure clears the major blood vessel(s) in the neck of fatty buildup. The major purpose of this procedure is to prevent a blockage of blood that could lead to a stroke. St. Joseph's surgeons perform more than 300 carotid endarterectomies annually – more than twice the number of any other hospital in Central New York.

  • Open Repair: Abdominal,
    Aortic + Thoracic Aneurysms

    Open repairs of aortic aneurysms traditionally require large incisions in the chest or abdomen. A cylindrical tube called a graft is sewn into the aorta, replacing the aorta where the aneurysm is. Repairing an aneurysm can often now be done through two incisions, one in each groin. The ability to do this surgery depends on the location of the aneurysm.

  • Major Arterial Bypass

    Major blockages may be bypassed (detouring the blood flow around the blockage) using a patient's existing vein or a synthetic graft (tube). This improves blood flow down to the foot.